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the debate we will have over healthcare in the coming legislative session, i believe we all agree that we want and need a healthier south carolina. and no one can deny that this administration, working with legislators like representative murrell smith and senator thomas alexander has made health a priority. we started 2011 with the medicaid budget out of balance and we brought it under control. we started with one of the lowest rates of insured children in the country and now south carolina is recognized for adopting leading edge strategies to reach more children. we started with mental health and addictive disorder programs, hobbled by cuts and together we've reinvested in both. we started with a medicaid program that required little accountability for quality or cost and we've demanded better value. these are success we should celebrate. but let us ask a simple question. are taxpayers getting the most health for the money they spend on healthcare? my answer is no. not by a long shot. we spend more money for health services per person than any nation on earth. year after year, we devote
, on national tv, that this government proposal we have is just one more choice for healthcare, and you can keep your private insurance you want it, at the time someone should have pointed out, wait a minute, if people don't have any choice what happens to their healthcare, their employer will decide. 200 million people have healthcare taken through employer paid insurance? so what choice do you and i if if we're working for dupont, what happens to our choices? now you know it costs a thousand per worker to insure a worker with health care and the government fine if you don't follow it is $2,000. so it's a perfect incentive to move more people off private insurance and health and human services as sebelius said, the private healthcare insurance industry is in a death spiral. of course they're in a death spiral. that the intention. if you eliminate then it's easier to move to singing-payer system which president obama has said, this is his goal and might take five, seven, eight, ten years. >> we're going next to ken and then alex and robert and then alicia, tom, chris, and lauren fox toned. >> i
has all but ended significant healthcare problems among those over 65. and the g.i. bill gets very little credit in 2012 for being the key social policy that built the american middle class. american middle class was built on two basic components of the g.i. bill. access to education, affordable access to education, which was avoucher program. the g.i.s could go to any school they wanted to go to the money went to them and not the schools. the second was access to affordable housing. if you roll the clock ahead to 2012, why is the middle class suffering? we don't have access to affordable high quality higher education. our students are taking on vastly too much debt. and my two sons, 38 and 34 years of age, who have good incomes, in one case more than mine -- cooperate even buy a house recently because the price of housing exceeds their income. and they're in the top 10% of income in the united states. that means housing is no longer accessible to the middle class. and when the middle class can't buy housing, the middle clarks as we have known it, since 1950, ceases to exist. so th
workers. >> that's a great question. well, healthcare reform was a huge step forward, and there's a lot of fights in the states now about making sure that the states adopt medicaid expansion under the healthcare reform because that would provide access to health care for a lot of very low-income workers who currently don't have access to health care so that includes some domestic workers certainly in new york, one thing we're experimenting with is trying to create a dome workers specific health insurance program that lowers the cost of health care for domestic workers by limiting the number of facilities and trying to be creative how to keep the costs down. the reality is, even with reform, it's going to be a challenge to afford it for a domestic worker earning poverty wages. and finally, i'd say that immigration reform is a huge factor here as well because undocumented immigrants currently are not included under the affordable care act. so, to make sure that if we can actually create a road to citizenship for all of these workers, it actually expand, there's a way in which health care
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4

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